NYWF 'Role Models not Runway Models'

lamb's breath

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Carrie Hammer Uses Role Models not Runway Models at NYFW
http://www.cosmopolitan.com.au/fash...-uses-role-models-not-fashion-models-at-nyfw/

9 Inspiring Photos of Models with Disabilities Working on the Runway at NYFW
http://www.cosmopolitan.com.au/fash...abilities-working-the-runway-at-nyfw-image-9/

Browsing Cosmo, so classy of me, I know, I came across the articles above and I thought it was fantastic. I've never paid much attention to high fashion but I will totally role my eyes in synchronisation with the rest of skinny gossip at the sight of headline's containing phrases 'plus-size model' and 'representing real women with 'curves''. Curves? Like 'awemahgawd', curve should not be made plural. These women are just one continuous curve called a ham-planet. This type of body may be the norm in western society, and increasingly in upper to middle-class China, India and a few other countries, but it is not healthy and should not be encouraged and I believe the emerging trend that plus-size models be a US size 14-18 (when previously plus size meant a healthy US size 6-10) is encouraging obesity as an ok part of society when it isn't.

It might be confronting to see older women or women and men with disabilities on the runway but it is confronting in a good way. Carrie Hammer show was great because women in the show were included based on their success in business or their overcoming of a physical adversity, such as being an amputee. I think if high fashion wants to take a step in this direction that is fine because I believe this is closer to true diversity and it highlights many social issues, such as the lack of representation of disability and the stigma surrounding it. Writing that previous sentence about representation, I realise I can't think of any actors or news actors who are disabled besides the girl from American Horror Story, Jamie Brewer and The Last Leg (hosted by Adam Hills who only has one leg) and that is why this kind of show is important. I don't think it detracts from the clothes or turns anyone into a spectacle.

I just wanted to share and to know what you girls think.
 
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lamb's breath

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plus size was never a us six, but beyond that you're on the money
Oops, I did try to work sizes out in my head but looking up plus sized model, even from 2004, I think my idea of how big a plus sized model isn't correct to begin with. Either way, the trend is that they are getting a lot bigger.
 

Silent Night

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Regarding the CEOs etc, I don't agree... I don't think being successful in business or becoming a famous author has anything to do with fashion and I actually think putting these people on the runway demeans the nature of their achievements. It's like saying that physical beauty is the highest possible accomplishment and that in order to acclaim a woman for something totally unrelated that she's done we'll give her honorary access to the theatre of the beautiful and praise how she looks. Why can't we actually value the fields in which they do excel and respect them fully as leaders in those areas? It's like giving a top brain surgeon an underwear spread as a reward for removing a tumor.
 
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Intrinsicality

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@lamb's breath .....I agree that Fashion as an extension of Art makes a statement. It could be political or social....and I believe it's an important phenomenon in the growth of a society...

I don't have a problem with that.....but about Antonio Urzi....you say, it doesn't make a spectacle of the models with disabilities - really?

I mean - he put baubles like dresses on them , a gorilla arm on... covered the face of one and painted the faces of some others etc....if they were invited on the show to participate and make a statement- shouldn't they have been respected enough to showcase some serious design? Without it seeming gimmicky? Don't get me wrong, he made a statement anyway. I am just not sure about his sincerity. It seems he went decidedly for the shock factor?

It seems exploitative to me.
 
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MCgirl

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Frankly, I don't care much for it. If I watch a show, I watch it for clothes or beautiful, skinny models. When I want to see accomplished women, I buy Forbes. Can we please just leave the job of modelling to models?

I don't get this new trend of mixing fashion with ideals, political correctedness (plus size), disabilities, personal accomplishments, etc. I know it's going to sound harsh, but I find it ridiculous. Fashion is generally about outward beauty, and putting people who either do not showcase the clothes well, or are not physically attractive themselves, while pretending that the audience is there to watch their inner beauty, perserverance, or career accomplishments, is a bit strange to me. I'm not saying that being beautiful on the outside is more important than being beautiful on the inside; there are more important things in life than being physically attractive, but let's be realistic and not pretend that a severly disabled person is as attractive as one who is healthy. It's harsh, but it's life. We all have our roles in life, not everyone can be a model, not everyone can be an actress, or CEO, or a doctor, and there is nothing wrong in belonging to a category different than a "model". What exactly are you accomplishing by putting a CEO on a runway?

Overall, I think that it's a great publicity stunt, but not much more. "Oh, look, I put an amputee on the show, that's gonna change so much for the disabled people". If you want to change something, give disabled people some real, measurable help; help them find a job, volunteer, help financially, try to make their lives better in some real terms.

It's after 3 pm and I'm tired, so if I accidentally offended someone or if something is incoherent, please don't beat me up :nervous:
 
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Golden ice

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Frankly, I don't care much for it. If I watch a show, I watch it for clothes or beautiful, skinny models. When I want to see accomplished women, I buy Forbes. Can we please just leave the job of modelling to models?

I don't get this new trend of mixing fashion with ideals, political correctedness (plus size), disabilities, personal accomplishments, etc. I know it's going to sound harsh, but I find it ridiculous. Fashion is generally about outward beauty, and putting people who either do not showcase the clothes well, or are not physically attractive themselves, while pretending that the audience is there to watch their inner beauty, perserverance, or career accomplishments, is a bit strange to me. I'm not saying that being beautiful on the outside is more important than being beautiful on the inside; there are more important things in life than being physically attractive, but let's be realistic and not pretend that a severly disabled person is as attractive as one who is healthy. It's harsh, but it's life. We all have our roles in life, not everyone can be a model, not everyone can be an actress, or CEO, or a doctor, and there is nothing wrong in belonging to a category different than a "model". What exactly are you accomplishing by putting a CEO on a runway?

Overall, I think that it's a great publicity stunt, but not much more. "Oh, look, I put an amputee on the show, that's gonna change so much for the disabled people". If you want to change something, give disabled people some real, measurable help; help them find a job, volunteer, help financially, try to make their lives better in some real terms.

It's after 3 pm and I'm tired, so if I accidentally offended someone or if something is incoherent, please don't beat me up :nervous:
I agree. Models are meant to be a canvas for designers to use to display their work. The only time it would be appropriate to have a disabled person on the runway is if it would enhance the collection or help portray something artistically that the designer wanted to convey in the show. Political correctness and castigs based on that have no place on the runway.
 
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amincer

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I agree. Models are meant to be a canvas for designers to use to display their work. The only time it would be appropriate to have a disabled person on the runway is if it would enhance the collection or help portray something artistically that the designer wanted to convey in the show. Political correctness and castigs based on that have no place on the runway.
Agreed, I think a good example is when Alexander McQueen used Aimee Mullins in his untitled S/S 1999 show. It was beautiful and tastefully done, people thought the wooden legs were just boots.
 
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Mandy.Bowie

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The "role models" is just a response to fit the consumer. Fat is becoming a trend and having models that fit the average looking woman is going to get the brand more money. In a year nobody is going to use "role models" as real models. The market will change and the brands will have to adjust to the new trends.
 

vanitas

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Agreed, I think a good example is when Alexander McQueen used Aimee Mullins in his untitled S/S 1999 show. It was beautiful and tastefully done, people thought the wooden legs were just boots.
I love this - the wooden legs are so beautiful, it's a look I like a lot overall and she's very striking looking. It looks like it was a design he wanted to do and which worked well on this model and she was included because it added something to the show, which is excellent.

I do have some experience of disability with family members (not physical) and although I can understand why inclusion is something people feel we should strive for (I believe this myself), I never personally feel affronted by disability being under-represented because I know just how hard it is to accomplish in a way that everyone is satisfied with; even within the small community I engage with on a regular basis no-one completely agrees with how things 'should' be done and several ventures have fallen by the wayside because not every person affected by something challenging wants to do the same kind of things.