Kristina Pimenova

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MickeyMouse

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Her age seems to be either 9 or 6.

But National Recruitment Officer for Bettina Management — a child modelling and talent agency — Johanna Millward, says it’s all about perception.

When shown the image of Kristina, she says: “It’s just a kid on a bed. You can say she has a sultry look on her face, or you can say it’s grumpy or grouchy — it’s all determined by the person looking and the experiences they’ve had in life,” she tells News Corp Australia.

http://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/real-life/cute-or-creepy-kristina-pimenova-may-be-six-but-shes-already-a-supermodel/story-fnixwvgh-1227135126748
 

Silent Night

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My problem with it would be that extreme visibility and mass attention can really influence someone and interfere with their self-image, confidence, relationships etc, no matter what sort of interest they provoke. Just the knowledge of being viewed and assessed by millions of people is quite a strong concept for anyone, let alone a nine-year-old. A child isn't likely to be robust enough to resist that and it could damage her development. Obviously it's not inevitable, but anecdotally it seems fairly common for child stars to be disturbed in some way when they grow up because they were exposed and not protected.

I also think it might have a negative effect on the family. If my parents effectively used me/my appearance to make money during my formative years I might develop the idea that their affection was based on my commodity value and/or looks, not on the fact of being their child. That would be a very sad suspicion.
 

MickeyMouse

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The whole concept of a child potentially earning real money always becomes tricky.
Look at Magnus Carlsen. He is deemed the greatest Chess player of ALL time.
If you were his parents and it was evident as a child/teenager that he had extraordinary talent, would you simply ignore his gift or would you support the extension of application and thus withdraw him from formal education (for a tutor) and travel around the world for tournaments and training?

Or, alternatively, with child geniuses. Do you keep them in their official school grade despite them being intellectually superior or do you let them enter college at 14 knowing they will never have a normal social friendship experience? They would be sacrificing their normality for potentially benefiting the rest of the world with inventions etc.

It's the same with this child. They are not 'normal'. So, do you ignore their gift (whatever it is)?
Supporting and pushing are so different and the only people who really know the true motivations are those in the situation.
 
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MickeyMouse

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Height: 137cm (4'6")
Weight: 30kg (66 lb)

Hair Color:
Blond
Hair Length: Long
Eye Color: Blue

Ethnicity:
European

Chest: 23 (58)
Waist: 20.5 (52)
Hips: 27 (68)

Dress size: 116
Shoe Size : 32

[Stats updated 2016/3/27]
 
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Artemis

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She's adorable but why must they call her "the prettiest girl in the world"--that's all kinds of damaging. Plus, it's not true. She's nothing near Thylane Blondeau (also a footballer's daughter??).

My parents were religious and very strict with me staying home ALL THE TIME to do chores and junk (mostly because they were lazy and selfish but. . .:whistling:). I had been scouted all my life but didn't start until I was off at school. I missed a lot of opportunities not just in modeling but in academics and sports because my family couldn't/wouldn't support me. Virgin Suicides all over the place.

You see a lot of these child model scams and some people think their kid is the messiah but, if the situation is right, it is a "high-tier" environment, and you child **truly** has a gift AND is willing to work hard at mastery, you can have a huge advantage in life.
 

MCgirl

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The whole concept of a child potentially earning real money always becomes tricky.
Look at Magnus Carlsen. He is deemed the greatest Chess player of ALL time.
If you were his parents and it was evident as a child/teenager that he had extraordinary talent, would you simply ignore his gift or would you support the extension of application and thus withdraw him from formal education (for a tutor) and travel around the world for tournaments and training?

Or, alternatively, with child geniuses. Do you keep them in their official school grade despite them being intellectually superior or do you let them enter college at 14 knowing they will never have a normal social friendship experience? They would be sacrificing their normality for potentially benefiting the rest of the world with inventions etc.

It's the same with this child. They are not 'normal'. So, do you ignore their gift (whatever it is)?
Supporting and pushing are so different and the only people who really know the true motivations are those in the situation.
I agree with this.
Personally, I think that life is too short to wait for another time- and I think that if a child has relatively grounded parents, then they will have a childhood whenever they are and whatever they do, whether this is being a model, actor, chess player, or just going to normal school. To me at least, the idea of people (e.g. Emma Watson) complaining they had "no childhood" is a bit of a strange concept. I think we have a very ideaolised image of it in the West, but if you look around, it's not that simple. There are kids who are sent to boarding schools young, kids who lost their parents, kids who are expected to make a living as soon as they can, kids who are bullied or unhappy, kids who attend ballet or other rigorous schools, etc. I used to have so many lessons, sports and tutors when I was 8 that I'd come home after 6 or 7 pm. Is it that different from a kid that spends some of that time modelling? I think that if a parent is grounded, lets a kid have some free time now and then and doesn't treat the child as a money-maker, but allows them to use their opportunities and chances in life and pushes them to be the best that they can, then there is nothing wrong with it. Kids are not porcelain dolls that will break if they have something productive to do- if they are good at chess, piano, modelling, art or ballet, then the parents have every right to give them the resources to pursue this. Talent is important, but it must be exercised, otherwise it goes to waste. The world won't wait, sadly, and it's good to have an edge later in life. Did I enjoy every single second of my childhood? No, but I am now extremely grateful to my parents for pushing me, because it all paid off. Letting a kid work (whether in classes or in a paying job) also teaches them responsibility, gives them varied experiences, and stimulates their brain, which I think is better than letting the kid decide what they want to do with all of their day after compulsory classes (which in most cases would be playing on the computer and eating candy).
I'm not saying kids shouldn't have their own free time- I just simply don't think that they need as much of it to be happy as many people think.
 
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Jailbait

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My parents were religious and very strict with me staying home ALL THE TIME to do chores and junk (mostly because they were lazy and selfish but. . .:whistling:). I had been scouted all my life but didn't start until I was off at school. I missed a lot of opportunities not just in modeling but in academics and sports because my family couldn't/wouldn't support me. Virgin Suicides all over the place.
:( :cry::(

My Advice: Enrage them with success. :twisted::party::kiss:
 
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oizys

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A little modelling for children's clothing is okay and good but that's too much... pictures of her naked legs in bed, her in hotpants...

why not just wait 7, 8 years?
 

seafolly

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I'm not going to comment on the moral implications of her being famous, doing such shoots, and making so much money when she is so young, but I do think she is absolutely beautiful! She's not striking or exotic looking, but she has a very innocent sort of prettiness.





She reminds me a bit of Gemma in a few pics, mainly in her eyes/eyebrows






Other times, she reminds me of baby Abbey



I think she's so beautiful :luv: I hope she matures well too...all I can think of is how beautiful Brooke Shields was when she was young and how I don't think she matured well.
 
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sabine

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Hmm, her mothers homophobic comments aren't going to win her many favours.. especially in the fashion industry.
 

MickeyMouse

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Hmm, her mothers homophobic comments aren't going to win her many favours.. especially in the fashion industry.
DAMN! I have been trying to find that clip from Ugly Betty where Marc says "You know the fashion industry. So homophobic."
(A horrible excuse to avoid seeing his boyfriend).
 
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