Working at Condé Nast

Tinyportia

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Reviving this very dead thread because I've recently realised that my dream would be to work for a fashion magazine. I realise that it may seem a very cliche goal due to the popularity of films such as DVP, but fashion and writing are both huge interests of mine and I can't think of a job that I'd enjoy more than working for a Condé Nast publication, even though I know that the process would be difficult, unlike it's portrayed in movies.

As this forum has grown quite a lot since the 2015, I was wondering whether any of you girls have any additional insider information as to how to optimise my chances at working at a Condé Nast (or similar) publication. I'm still in high school and have a 4.0 GPA and a 99% average in English. I'd be particularly interested in writing for a magazine, so if anyone has any pointers into the best colleges to aim for (I'm assuming somewhere in NY would be ideal in order to make connections and have access to more opportunities throughout the year?), which degree would be ideal, internships to apply for and how to best prepare myself now while I'm still in high school, I'd appreciate it so so so much :luvluv:
I am sure other members can give better advice/tips but I can share with you the experience of my friend who works for Vogue. She didn't do any internships or the like until she got to uni. As you are still in high school my advice would be to start thinking about what you want to study at university and start preparing for that. No doubt you will need to study some kind of journalism/professional communications degree. I'd do some research into what universities have the best journalism/communications courses and what ATAR you need to get into your chosen course.

My friend studied a Bachelor of Journalism. While at uni she did a range of internships which she got simply through cold-calling organisations! Her dream job was to work for a fashion magazine but that didn't come until approximately 5 years after she finished uni. Her first job after finishing uni was a local community newspaper. While working for the local newspaper, she cold-called a few fashion magazines and arranged to have coffees with the Editors in Chief to try and get her name out there. Eventually a job came up at Vogue which she applied for and because the Editor in Chief remembered my friend from having coffee with her, my friend was successful in landing the job.

One thing you could start doing now (if you aren't already) is "studying" - my friend said she was basically preparing her whole life for the job at Vogue. For as long as she can remember she would read books and magazines about fashion to improve her knowledge (not just reading fashion magazines, but texts about designs, designers and the history of fashion and design etc). She was also a member of TFS and spent a lot of time reading and engaging on the forums. She also said she read criticism of her favourite fashion writers and studied their work.

Hope that helps :)
 
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elle_w00ds

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No doubt you will need to study some kind of journalism/professional communications degree.
Yes doubt. If you want to work in PR or fashion, a business degree is preferable and it also allows for more flexibility were you to decide differently later :)

I'll appropriate two of my friends for case studies:

Girl A is Danish, went to London to study marketing at London College of Fashion while working part time at that department store which isn't Harrod's throughout her course. She now does international PR for one of the major shoe brands (think Gianvito Rossi, not Birman or Schutz).

Girl B went to Georgetown for organisational studies while working for a contemporary prized boutique chain. She also completed an internship with a major auction house. She went on to write (and then edit) for a Condé Nast publication and is now in online retail.

Both girls come from extremely well connected families without which I highly doubt either of them would have landed the same jobs so shortly out of college. Both girls also come from minted families without which they wouldn't have been able to survive on fashion industry salaries.

If you have done any research at all you would probably already have stumbled upon this video, but I'll attach it just in case:
 
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PetiteLapin

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Reviving this very dead thread because I've recently realised that my dream would be to work for a fashion magazine. I realise that it may seem a very cliche goal due to the popularity of films such as DVP, but fashion and writing are both huge interests of mine and I can't think of a job that I'd enjoy more than working for a Condé Nast publication, even though I know that the process would be difficult, unlike it's portrayed in movies.

As this forum has grown quite a lot since the 2015, I was wondering whether any of you girls have any additional insider information as to how to optimise my chances at working at a Condé Nast (or similar) publication. I'm still in high school and have a 4.0 GPA and a 99% average in English. I'd be particularly interested in writing for a magazine, so if anyone has any pointers into the best colleges to aim for (I'm assuming somewhere in NY would be ideal in order to make connections and have access to more opportunities throughout the year?), which degree would be ideal, internships to apply for and how to best prepare myself now while I'm still in high school, I'd appreciate it so so so much :luvluv:
I don’t know about the fashion industry exactly but I just wrote a lot and self published as well as submitted. This started my portfolio. Not long after doing this, I started writing for the magazine I was a fan of (social sciences). Although I no longer work for this magazine, they come to me for help as I now do editorial work as a freelancer. I started writing for the magazine company while I was in high school. I also got accepted as a writer for the community magazine (youngest on the team for both magazines).

A writer’s resume is different from a regular office job resume so if you’d like, I would be more than happy to help you.

I started making the switch from social science articles to books and business articles. Due to my strong background, it wasn’t too difficult. However, I actually know some stuff about business. I’m just expanding my topics to expand my portfolio and make it easier to get a writing job in fields I know nothing about.
 
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jacquemuse

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@lattelover in case it's helpful: I found a post from a woman who, as far as I can tell, didn't really have connections but wrote like crazy and really hustled during university. She ended up at Teen Vogue (her focus wasn't fashion—she did news and politics writing) and is now writing for Refinery 29. She has a post on her writing experiences during university and how she got into Teen Vogue.

Although her path is a bit different than what you described wanting, I think it's useful just to understand mechanically what she did—how she got a first job, how she pitched to publications, how she leveraged her existing experience—as I find a lot of career advice doesn't necessarily give you steps to follow, or a way of specifically understanding what someone did to get to their current career.
 
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Snoopy

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Internships are what jobs in this industry are made of. Just start and get as many as you can and really apply yourself to try and meet as many people in the industry as you can through them and stay in touch.
 
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