Creating a personal "uniform"

nbtween

Rookie
Joined
Jun 25, 2012
Posts
158
Karma
52
Location
Canada
I'm on my phone so it's hard for me to look for and link, but I read an article saying that the bran is trained to make a limited number of decisions in a day (irrespective of their complexity) so having a personal uniform would eliminate some decision-making, allowing the brain to focus on work related decisions.
THIS !! That's why I chose to try this. It's challenging for me though right now. Seem to be in a "shopping mode" .. Maybe it's a constant reconfiguring and refining process?
 

nbtween

Rookie
Joined
Jun 25, 2012
Posts
158
Karma
52
Location
Canada
Ooooh I am feeling so inspired by this. I'd like to switch to 100% black and neutrals, maybe with a "pop" of red in an item.

However, I get so scared of wearing my "good" clothes, like I'll wear all my "okay" clothes and save the good ones for some other time that never happens. Anyone else have this problem? I imagine paring things down would force me to wear my good stuff all the time, which is preferable.

Also, to the girls who have a minimalist wardrobe, how often do you find yourself washing clothes/at the dry cleaners? And, do you find that the clothes wear out quicker?
For me, the only way to make my uniform viable was to choose clothing that was all wash and wear, as I do a LOT of laundry because I own less. Still figuring this one out. Noticed I've picked up some new clothes and it's made my wardrobe too time consuming and stressful again. Not as happy when my wardrobe grows! .. For me, to keep this fun and doable, I decided that my "good clothes" were my daily clothes, which has helped me feel wonderful every time I put on my clothes for the day.
 

nbtween

Rookie
Joined
Jun 25, 2012
Posts
158
Karma
52
Location
Canada
I have this problem. I have some pieces I love and try to keep them new, so I hardly wear them. It's ridiculous, I have a big wardrobe anyway, so the chances of these items to get too used to be wearable are very slim anyway.
This makes me smile. At some point recently, I just decided, "What's the point in owning clothes I never wear!?" .. As an actor who also needs and audition wardrobe, this theory is tested daily, but must admit, I resent "good clothes" taking up unnecessary room in my closet if I am never wearing them!
 

nbtween

Rookie
Joined
Jun 25, 2012
Posts
158
Karma
52
Location
Canada
This happens to me a lot. It might be better if I didn't work from home but because I'm in a studio in the house all day it seems ridiculous to wear anything too nice, especially because I use ink and paint and often spill stuff all over myself.

What I'm trying to do is build up a wardrobe of nice house clothes that are comfy to work in and that it's not a disaster if I get stains on them, so at the moment I'm wearing tights, over the knee socks and oversized scruffy jumpers a lot. Having a set of similar clothes to wear each day definitely helps speed things up and it's just one less decision to make, I find.
Oh I love this so much. This sounds like a daily "work" wardrobe to bring such joy each day. :)
 

nbtween

Rookie
Joined
Jun 25, 2012
Posts
158
Karma
52
Location
Canada
I feel like I'm taking the first steps towards something like this, however, as a retail-working student I don't want to have a uniform of sorts yet simply because I'm not in a professional environment so I like the flexibility my life allows me. I have however had most of my clothes for 2-3+ years, and they're still perfectly appropriate/stylish because of these rules. For the record, everything I own is black, various shades of grey, (not much) white, deep navy blue, and deep foresty green.

My main rule with shopping/things I own is that I basically want to be able to wear anything with everything. Both colour-wise and shape/style. Any sweaters I own have to layer as nicely over a dress as they must work with trousers or a skirt, and every blouse or shirt has to work with trousers/skirts. I like to have shoes that work with everything as well, but also make me feel like everything has been pulled together by them. I find that keeping the versatility with everything I own makes styling myself so easy, layering even easier, and really, if I'm in a hurry, I can grab virtually any two things, throw them on in whatever order I choose, and then leave.

Even things that may not seem like they could go together - cropped turtleneck and a slip dress have proven me wrong. However, by this rule, I get rid of anything that proves itself difficult to style, and if I can't find a way to make it work at any time in a two-week period, it's donated/sold/returned (unless I feel it can have potential with a better pair of jeans). Extra points go to micromini shift dresses/t shirt dresses that double as shirts that I can wear with a midi skirt/skinnies.
I've never thought of this but LOVE this concept. I wish I had seen this before shopping this past month. Am now understanding why I'm resenting some of my new pieces: They don't go with everything. Thank you for these thoughtful words. :)
 

nbtween

Rookie
Joined
Jun 25, 2012
Posts
158
Karma
52
Location
Canada
Miinimalism is a really inspiring way of living - and thinking! Avoiding decision fatigue is one of many arguments in its favor (thanks for the links, @Eternal Summer ! I need reads like those) and can actually applied to dietary choices (we had a thread about it, if I remember well).

Anyway, back to clothing. My basics are fitted pants, shirts (white ones but also in pastel colours), simple blouses. When the weather gets colder, I just throw on a cardigan or a big sweater. No jewelry, and two pairs of shoes for the cold times.

Even though I love every item I own, I hate wearing the same look over and over again. Does anyone struggle with that? Any tips?
Yes yes yes. This!! Less decisions. Hmm, noticing the same does apply to me with food. Too many choices make me unhappy and overwhelmed. Ache to simplify all the time. Makes me feel better. Makes life feel better!
 

nbtween

Rookie
Joined
Jun 25, 2012
Posts
158
Karma
52
Location
Canada
Miinimalism is a really inspiring way of living - and thinking! Avoiding decision fatigue is one of many arguments in its favor (thanks for the links, @Eternal Summer ! I need reads like those) and can actually applied to dietary choices (we had a thread about it, if I remember well).

Anyway, back to clothing. My basics are fitted pants, shirts (white ones but also in pastel colours), simple blouses. When the weather gets colder, I just throw on a cardigan or a big sweater. No jewelry, and two pairs of shoes for the cold times.

Even though I love every item I own, I hate wearing the same look over and over again. Does anyone struggle with that? Any tips?
Forgot to say: Feel like for me, to fight the boredom and monotony I've started layering more to create "different looks" of the same clothing and have a few accessories that bring me joy. The biggest way I'm trying to fight the boredom is by only owning clothes which bring me JOY.
 

nbtween

Rookie
Joined
Jun 25, 2012
Posts
158
Karma
52
Location
Canada
This is how I am with dresses.

As for personal uniform...mine sort of happen accidentally. I go through phases. But generally I end up doing neutrals and a pop of color.

@Eternal Summer do you have a study you're thinking of on this? I've heard theoretical evidence (esp. coming from existential psych, been reading some Frankl) but I don't have any studies that back it up. (Feel free to PM if we're derailing this but I think it's relevant)
Not sure if you've already read this but there's a book that changed my life this summer surrounding the affects on our minds and happiness (as well as a how to de-clutter and minimize). It's called:
The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing by Marie Kondo.
 

nbtween

Rookie
Joined
Jun 25, 2012
Posts
158
Karma
52
Location
Canada
I consider that I have a uniform but I don't wear identical clothes every day. My clothes are all in the same style so I can pretty much wear anything with anything else (black V-neck, slacks, scarf, heeled boots, messy bun), but there's enough variation (fabric, cut, trimmings) that I can dress up or down or change with the season. I have frocks for going out and they're also within a restricted range of styles but each in different fabrics and designs. I change my looks with accessories if I want a change and I like to do little touches with a belt or scarf to give something new to favourite garments.

I actually love clothes and don't dress this way because I'm not interested; it's because I think I've found a look that works for my body and that allows me to express myself through unusual tailoring and fabrics (I love structured garments and clothes that hang differently, and I like to choose an outfit based on shapes and materials more than colour). I make my own clothes or alter purchases as well to fit my style and I always appreciate details in the way my clothes are constructed. I have a Pinterest of catwalk looks and details that I want to try and replicate with my sewing machine and that helps me develop my wardrobe even when I don't have lots of money for shopping.
Oh wow. This sounds incredible. I appreciated reading that it's not because you don't enjoy clothes: Me too. Just too any other daily decisions and extra stuff takes up extra space in my mind. I really love your words on accessorizing. .. Oh WOW, I wish I had a talent in design and clothing. What a GOOD talent to have! :)
 

cantaloupe

Rookie
Joined
Jan 10, 2016
Posts
85
Karma
132
Location
USA
Not sure if you've already read this but there's a book that changed my life this summer surrounding the affects on our minds and happiness (as well as a how to de-clutter and minimize). It's called:
The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing by Marie Kondo.
@nbtween - this book was also life-changing for me! I became a lot more relaxed/less anxious in my home and in general after getting rid of ~70% of my clothes. I used to feel guilty for getting rid of usable things, but Marie Kondo's simple advice really helped me... basically, to mentally "thank" the piece of clothing (or other item) for the joy it once brought you, accept that it no longer brings you joy, then send it on its way (to a donation box). This mentality is great to apply in other aspects of your life... removing yourself from unfulfilling friendships or relationships, discarding food that you don't want/need anymore, etc :grin:
 

nbtween

Rookie
Joined
Jun 25, 2012
Posts
158
Karma
52
Location
Canada
@nbtween - this book was also life-changing for me! I became a lot more relaxed/less anxious in my home and in general after getting rid of ~70% of my clothes. I used to feel guilty for getting rid of usable things, but Marie Kondo's simple advice really helped me... basically, to mentally "thank" the piece of clothing (or other item) for the joy it once brought you, accept that it no longer brings you joy, then send it on its way (to a donation box). This mentality is great to apply in other aspects of your life... removing yourself from unfulfilling friendships or relationships, discarding food that you don't want/need anymore, etc :grin:
Oh my. YES! This this this! How did I never think to apply these principles elsewhere? Thank you thank you thank you. Think I could use another read of this one. Feels like when I forget to remember these principles, I can recede in my minimalistic approach to my closet and belongings. Need to remember this: No guilt. Just thankfulness for the place it filled in my life prior to passing it along to another happy recipient. :)
 

blue

Worker Bee
Joined
May 14, 2012
Posts
421
Karma
162
I do something like this anyway. Top, skirt or pants depending on weather, leggings depending on weather. Coat depending on weather. Shoes depending on weather. Generally a black or grey skirt and a patterned top. My wardrobe is boring for work/school. I have designated shoes and coats/jackets for the weather. If I need to dress it up, I just put on some jewelry and bold makeup. I don't want to spend too much time trying to dress up when I need to be somewhere asap and on time.